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The 33 Days Newsletter Challenge – Day 13

Today is the thirteenth day of the 33 days challenge. The question for today was: “Do you think you’re strong?”.

Let’s see the answers.

L.B. “I like this one.

Personally… I think strength takes many shapes. But I’ve always admired those who express their strength through making the people around them stronger. That’s what I aspire to.

Hey, that’s a very nice way to put it. You gain power by empowering others.

S.C. “I do not think I have been strong before I had kids. I thought I was, but I was not.

I hear you. I know how it is.

C.F. “For me, being strong is “to trust yourself when all men doubt you” and do what is right. “Everybody knows what is right, but few have the courage to do that” (an approximate quotation from a famous movie).

“If” it’s my favourite poem so I know very well what you mean. At times, other people may be against you. And that doesn’t mean they’re wrong, or something. You just have to follow your heart.

A.A. “I’m strong. I am a perfect human being capable to adapt in order to survive. But, sometimes, I become very human and I question my life wondering if it will be meaningful. In these special moments the need to be stronger arises and the change is starting its evolutionary play.

Adaptation, adaptation, adaptation. I hear you.

L.C. “Have you ever had a dream where you fall down and there was nothing around which you hang by? You feel pain, suffering, despair. The end of world. The end of you. And then…peace. Gratitude that you know Nothing.

In my last two years these kind of moments and meditation made me stronger and brought me down to earth. What’s next? No idea.

Wow, that’s a very interesting take. Gaining power by surrendering. I like that.

S.L. “I consider myself a strong person. I’m resilient to setbacks as I’m able always eager to learn from setbacks and move on. I’m able to solve problems in a calm manner despite being in emotionally-charged situations. I’ve yet to learn to say ‘no’ and set firm boundaries as I’m still catching myself feeling guilty for not complying with other’s requests.

That’s hard, right? That lesson of “saying no”? I’ve been there too. Still am, at times, but I learn.

B.D. “In some ways, I do think I’m strong. I have to put up with a lot of physical pain, loneliness, and heartache. But still, I keep a positive outlook on life, I keep going out in public (though disabled) and singing at open mics which make myself and other people happy. I also recently got a certificate in nutrition, so I help people with their diets. I never run out of love to give to other people. I also have a lot of faith and patience and know that I will be a success one day. My hope and faith keep me strong.

Thanks for sharing that with me, I really feel empowered by your attitude.

Now, my answer to this one.

Strength is a matter of adaptation over context. It doesn’t have an absolute way of being measured. For instance, you may be strong enough to lift a 50k each day at the gym, but when you have to lift, let’s say, a car from a person who just got hit by that car, you’ll find yourself helpless. Or, who knows, you may be the type that can’t lift 10k at the gym, but when you really have to lift that car, you’ll do it in a second.

Power always comes with its counterpart, which is weakness. It’s part of a process. It can be increased only if you accept that you’ve bee powerless at some point in life.

Yes, I do think I’m strong, but there are areas in which I allow myself to be weak. Either because I feel that way, or because I plan to become even more powerful in that area.

If you want to be a part of this 33 days challenge, and receive the next questions, all you have to do is to sign up here. It takes only a minute.

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Running For My Life - from zero to ultramarathoner


The spooky thing about depression is that it sneaks in. There aren’t really trumpets and loud voices announcing: “Hail, hail, this is depression entering the room, all rise!” Nope. It’s slow, silent, creepy. It doesn’t even look like depression. It starts with small isolation thoughts like: “Maybe I shouldn’t get out today, I just don’t feel like going out”. And then it does the same next day. And then the day after that and so on. And then it starts to whisper louder and louder in your ears: “Why would you go outside, you loser? Didn’t have enough yet? Want more people to make fun of how much of a big, fat loser you are?”

And then you start to breath in guilt and shame, instead of air. Every breathe you take is putting more dark thoughts into your body.

Until you get stuck. You can’t move anymore. At all.

If you want to know how I got out of this space, eventually, check out my latest book on Amazon and Kindle.

Running For My Life -from zero to ultramarathoner

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