The 33 Days Newsletter Challenge – Day 9

Today is the ninth day of the 33 days challenge. The question for today was: “How often do you laugh?”.

Let’s see the answers.

L.K. “My teenage daughter and my new boyfriend are at war. It is absolutely hilarious to watch them go. It started out with putting rocks or other in each other’s boots and shoes to hanging the shoes on the hooks by the door. Then this weekend when I was planning on putting the Christmas tree away, my boyfriend decided to instead put it in my daughter room as another joke on her. When she got home after she finished work at midnight, she had her laugh then put the tree in front of my bedroom door and I had a scare when I got up the next morning. That same day I was looking for the tree to put it away and searched the house, closets, balcony and even the bathroom. Finally I asked Jeff where he had put the tree. He denied everything about his doing anything. Finally I found the tree in the shower stall. He knew that when Amanda finishes work, she takes a shower. Midnight and sure enough she took her shower. Revenge is sweet because this am, Jeff’s shoes were tied together in so many knots, and had rocks jammed into them and it took Jeff about 10 just to get the knots out.

In my home this is a regular occurrence and the laughter we all have together is wonderful. Yes laughter is the best medicine.

Thanks for the laugh. And for ideas. You surely live in a creative surrounding. Keep them coming.

B.D. “Laughing: I purposely look for things to laugh at several times a day, usually on Facebook, but if not Facebook, then in romantic comedy films, or if I go out to a music jam, my friends will make me laugh. Laughing is very important for good health—I can’t live without a good laugh every day! I also will post funny things on Facebook, because I want to help my friends laugh too! 😀

I hear you.

S.C. “I laugh as much as possible. At silly things, mostly. 10-15 times a day. Sometimes at silly things such as the funny looking extended leg of our pet lizard, Spike.

I know laugh is essential to our physical health and spiritual well being. So, I got wiser throughout the years and I laugh much more these days. I laugh on purpose. I no longer take anything too seriously.

That’s fundamental for me too. I laugh a lot at myself. If I find myself unable to be sarcastic on myself, I know there’s something wrong with me.

A.A. “Just by curiosity, I will do the counting tomorrow in order to have an accurate view 😉 Meanwhile, I will simply say that I am a moderate fan of laugh. I do it more often with my child as he find reasons to laugh out of nothing. With him laughing comes naturally, just for fun. I also laugh with adults (my half; my soul-mate; my friends). For the rest of the world I am a serious person ;))

Let me know when you finish the counting. I’m curious.

C.F. “I laugh quite often but I’m afraid that not every time this expresses my inner emotion. I might laugh, but be absent-minded or sad. It even happened to me, at least once, to laugh and cry at the same time. A Japanese professor told me once I was too serious, but I remember being reproached lack of rigour as well. I guess I’m just too sensitive… but of course… I’m a Scorpio 🙂

Laughing and crying at the same time – that’s surely a nice experience to have.

S.L. “I laugh everyday. I make silly jokes everyday. I used to laugh to cover up my sadness, anger, nervousness, etc. Now, I do it less often. I laugh because I feel like laughing. To make me happy. To make others happy. Even if it’s just for a few minutes. But, it is natural for me to laugh, even for the most slightest silly thing that I encounter. 😀

Again, somebody using laugh to mask their real emotions. That’s strange. Glad you’re not doing it anymore.

J. “I laugh A LOT ! I started this journey in life and early on found that laughter made everything better for myself & others, or most others. My first grade teacher might be an exclusion, she gave me the nickname Giggle Box, and still referred to me as that twenty years later. My desk was relocated many times during that year because of my apparent outbursts of laughter, over what, I’m not sure. I found humor in my first grade classroom that has followed me thru out life. I work in a hospital and many of my coworkers comment on how they smile or laugh when they hear me giggling and just recently a regular guest at the casino where I go commented to my friend & I how much he loves my laugh and how it makes his day. I have no idea what my laugh/giggle sounds like but I’m happy that it’s not an annoying sound as my life would be miserable if I had to stifle it. Laughter should be shared often, it helps the saddest & most uncomfortable situations to be more bearable. During my years visiting hospice patients in their homes I found that even as we are close to death laughter can still be shared.

Thanks for sharing, Giggle Box :).

Here’s my answer.

I admit I laugh each and every day. I expose myself to humour in every conceivable form. I watch a lot of comedies, I read a lot of jokes and usually I follow a lot of “social media fun”, like in memes or funny pictures (I’m not into cats, though). But the most enjoyable laugh is the one I get when I’m with friends. I socialise a lot, mainly because of my lifestyle: I’m a digital nomad, I organise live events every week and I teach tango. That means a lot of mingling.

Every few evenings we go out, share a glass of wine or just our stories and laugh our buts out. Sometimes, it feels better than a gym workout. And healthier, too.

If you want to be a part of this 33 days challenge, and receive the next 31 questions, all you have to do is to sign up here. It takes only a minute.

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Running For My Life - from zero to ultramarathoner


The spooky thing about depression is that it sneaks in. There aren’t really trumpets and loud voices announcing: “Hail, hail, this is depression entering the room, all rise!” Nope. It’s slow, silent, creepy. It doesn’t even look like depression. It starts with small isolation thoughts like: “Maybe I shouldn’t get out today, I just don’t feel like going out”. And then it does the same next day. And then the day after that and so on. And then it starts to whisper louder and louder in your ears: “Why would you go outside, you loser? Didn’t have enough yet? Want more people to make fun of how much of a big, fat loser you are?”

And then you start to breath in guilt and shame, instead of air. Every breathe you take is putting more dark thoughts into your body.

Until you get stuck. You can’t move anymore. At all.

If you want to know how I got out of this space, eventually, check out my latest book on Amazon and Kindle.

Running For My Life -from zero to ultramarathoner

Dragos Roua

The guy who started all this. Entrepreneur, ultra-marathoner, tanguero, father and risk taker. I’m blogging here, but I also spend a lot of time in this marvelous space.. You’re invited, by the way.

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